Category Archives: Legislative business

Abattoirs included as eligible for payments in the Agriculture Bill

LORD TREES’ AMENDMENT 87 TO THE AGRICULTURE BILL ELICITS AN IMPORTANT CLARIFICATION FROM THE GOVERNMENT – A WIN FOR BOTH ANIMAL WELFARE AND THE SELF-SUSTAINABILITY OF THE RURAL ECONOMY.

On Thursday 16th July, in response to Lord Trees amendment, Minister’s confirmed that slaughtering would be recognised as one of the key ‘ancillary services’ eligible for public funds. The Amendment was supported by Baronesses, Lady Mallalieu, Lady Jones of Whitchurch and Lady Bakewell of Hardington Mandeville. 

This will enable assistance to be given in an appropriate case to a licensed abattoir which, for example, provides a private kill service or enables slaughtering facilities in an area otherwise without adequate provision. 

“I am delighted to say that we have had it confirmed that the definition of ancillary activities in Clause 1(5) covers slaughtering under either “preparing” or “processing” 

Ministers closing remarks to Amendment 87 of the Agriculture Bill, 16th July 2020 

The clarification was all the more welcome as we had reason to suspect that there had been reluctance to enable abattoirs to receive this support.  

In the last few weeks VPRF and others had written a letter to the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs George Eustice and had discussed the issue in detail with Lord Gardiner, the Parliamentary Under Secretary of State for Rural Affairs and Biosecurity. 

These conversations and others allowed the government to clarify their position before the committee stage debate. We were very glad that at the last minute the Minister at the Dispatch Box confirmed that “slaughter” would be included in the list of “ancillary activities” eligible for support.   

 The proposed amendment was supported by evidence from a recent All Part Parliamentary Group (APGAW) inquiry; “The Future for Small Abattoirs in the UK”. 

Lord Trees argued that: 

Given the key role that small abattoirs can play in improving animal welfare, enabling local food production and enabling the financial sustainability of livestock  farming, while contributing to the wider rural economy and our national food security, I submit that there is a strong case for their eligibility for support, subject to conditions, under this Bill.” 

He emphasised; 

“The amendment is not about subsidising abattoirs. It would merely allow as eligible for assistance certain abattoirs that recognise the higher regulatory standards rightly required for operations that are relatively low throughput and local.” 

A selection of messages received

“Thank you so much for tabling the amendment…as a small abattoir operator it was good to hear that our place in the local meat supply chain is being recognised at last. I realise this is a first step to securing a future for small abattoirs but it gives them hope and the means for possible support

John Mettrick, Mettricks Butchers, 16th July 2020

“thank you so much for your work in support of abattoirs and for the successful outcome yesterday, we very much appreciate all you have done” 

Megan Perry, Head of Communications, Sustainable Food Trust, 17th July 2020 

Excellent news on the amendment!” 

Tim Morris, Non-executive board member for the Animal Health and Welfare Board for England


“I cannot refrain from saying bravo, hooray and lots of other adulatory adjectives. You spoke brilliantly, have been persistent and utterly persuasive and we finally have some indication from the Government that they are listening.” 

Lady Jane Parker, Sustainable Food Trust 

Above: Farmers Guardian article 24th July 2020 

Read more about the build-up to this Amendment in a Vet Record Article (July 2020) by Intern Catrina Prince: 

also see Lord Tree’s full speech, as recorded in Hansard 

…and further reading and supporting data can be found in the APGAW report “The Future for Small Abattoirs in the UK”  

The Veterinary Nurses (Protection of Title) Bill

Updated January 2016

What did we do?

On Tuesday 19 May Lord Trees submitted the ‘Veterinary Nurses (Protection of Title) Bill’ into the House of Lords Bill ballot.

As it is drawn up, the Bill would prohibit use of the title ‘veterinary nurse’ for any person whose name is not on our Register of Veterinary Nurses. Any non-registered person who used the title veterinary nurse or a name, title or description that implied they were on the Register would be guilty of an offence and may be fined or convicted under the Veterinary Surgeons Act.

Veterinary Nurse (Protection of Title) Bill

Why?

Currently the title ‘veterinary nurse’ is not protected, and this is a problem because it means anyone, even if they lack the relevant training and education, can refer to themselves as a veterinary nurse. The veterinary professions believe that this should change.

Registered veterinary nurses :

  • may give medical treatment to, or carry out minor surgery on, animals under Schedule 3 of the Veterinary Surgeons Act 1966 under the direction of a veterinary surgeon.
  • commit to follow the RCVS Code of Professional Conduct, and keep their skills and knowledge up-to-date.
  • may be subject to our disciplinary process if they should fall short of their professional responsibilities.
  • may be suspended or removed from the Register at the direction of the RVN Disciplinary Committee if found guilty of serious professional misconduct.

Consequently, we believe that it is inappropriate for people without formal training to describe themselves as a ‘veterinary nurse’, and that to do so potentially puts both animal welfare and the welfare of the individual employed as a veterinary nurse without qualification at risk.

Protection of the title is supported by the British Veterinary Nursing Association, the British Veterinary Association, the respective representative bodies for veterinary nurses and veterinary surgeons in the UK, and also by their regulator, the Royal College of Veterinary Surgeons.

See more at: http://www.rcvs.org.uk/registration/about-the-vn-register/protect-the-title-veterinary-nurse

How to submit a Private Members Bill

  1. Ensure your sponsoring Peer has taken the Oath of Allegiance.
  2. Submit a Private Members Bill into the ballot.
  3. Get drawn early in the ballot to improve the chances of getting time in the chamber.

How did we do?

The Bill was submitted on time and was drawn 36 out of 44 bills entered into the Lords ballot. This relatively low position in the ballot decreases our chance of getting time in the chamber for the second reading of the Bill; in the House of Commons bill ballot, it is expected that the first seven bills drawn are usually debated in the chamber. The rest of the time in either chamber is devoted to Government-led legislation. If the Bill did make it through the Lords it would require sponsorship from an MP to pass through the Commons chamber and become law.

The introduction of the bill stimulated wide discussions and media attention and helped to raise the profile of this issue. An online petition was launched by the RCVS in August 2015 and received over 20,000 signatures (correct as of December 2015).

How did the Government respond?

Minister George Eustace discussed the protection of the title Veterinary Nurse with his DEFRA team and whilst they are extremely sympathetic with the aims of the bill we have been advised that it will not be supported by the government. The government believes that “the legal protection already in place to make sure that animals in veterinary care are treated only by individuals who are trained and qualified to do so” is sufficient and that “criminalising the use of the term “veterinary nurse” by other animal carers in a veterinary setting to be an unduly harsh solution.” To address the issue DEFRA have suggested that the “RCVS and the veterinary membership associations work with veterinary practices to encourage that only properly qualified, registered veterinary nurses should be referred to as such.”

Where do we go from here

Despite this position the government have shown willingness to continue discussions and have invited the RCVS “to discuss further with Defra how new thinking may require existing laws and regulations to be amended to bolster and clarify the role of veterinary nurses.”

 

Draft Dog Microchipping Regulations

Microchipping of Dogs (England) Regulations 2014

On Thursday afternoon the new Microchipping of Dogs (England) Regulations were considered in Grand Committee. Lord De Mauley (C), Baroness Miller of Chilthorne Domer (LD), Lord Trees (CB) and Lord Grantchester (L) all contributed to the discussion around the Regulations. Links to HOL Hansard online and the Parliament TV coverage of the discussion are provided below.

Lord Trees speaking in Grand Committee
Lord Trees speaking in Grand Committee

Lord Trees welcomed the legislation, but warned that it would not be a silver bullet for all canine-related animal welfare issues. After scrutinising the legislation there were a number of areas where we felt the wording left things unclear, but the Minister respectfully disagreed. In Regulation 9, the term ‘veterinary nurse’ was used in the manner of a legally and professionally protected term when it is not. We suggested that the term ‘registered veterinary nurse’ be substituted because this will become a professionally protected term under the new Charter of the Royal College of Veterinary Surgeons, which is likely to be granted in February. We await an answer on this point.

We were surprised to note that it was not considered appropriate to legislate on the site of implantation, despite the existence of a specific ISO-standard, but that the legislation does provide for the notification of the Secretary of State on migration of a microchip – which seems entirely unnecessary.

LordDeMauley_Microchipping_220115Last, but not least, the legislation around transfer of ownership seemed unclear (Regulation 8). Lord De Mauley clarified that the the new keeper must update the database where there is a change of keeper. However, and somewhat confusingly, not to do so is not listed as an offence. The Noble Lord the Minister intends to write to us on any points he had not addressed or wished to address further.